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Fuel Tap

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Hello All,

I have had to replace the fuel tap on my 650 and wanted one with a reserve as well. I bought one from Hitchcocks - probably a 'generic' Indian made one suitable for Enfields, but when tightened in situ it is impossible to operate as the 'lever' is up against the frame rail. (The fitting screws in directly - no running nut to adjust final position). I have tried different thickness washers to try and get it to end up where it will a/ not foul the frame, and b/ actually be operable, but without any joy.

Before I get a 1/4BSP nipple and socket to bring the tap 1" lower, (and smaller reserve level!) is there a better solution? I don't care for originality provided that I don't irrevocably change something that would stop someone putting it back to standard in the future.

So

1/ Did slimline bikes ever have a fuel tap with reserve?

2/ Was the reserve part reachable without stopping and groping up under the tank?

3/ Are such things available and more importantly, are they any good with today's fuels?

Am I searching for something that doesn't exist?

Your thoughts please.

 

Regards,

George

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As far as I know this

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TRIUMPH-NORTON-PLUNGER-FUEL-TAP-1-4-X-1-4-T100-T120-TR6-ATLAS-06-7836-82-1717/313087447866?_trkparms=aid%3D111001%26algo%3DREC.SEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20160811114145%26meid%3D9f2dacf2fc3341e58e9e6cafa7f97a0d%26pid%3D100667%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D3%26mehot%3Dnone%26sd%3D233209091008%26itm%3D313087447866%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2334524&_trksid=p2334524.c100667.m2042

is the type fitted by the factory.

Fritz

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Thanks fot that Fritz,

Do you know if these were installed with a running nut to align it up correctly?

George 

 

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I have seen that type on  Nortons, I suspect this is an Indian or Chinese replica, does not look to have a loose nut ,but at that price worth a punt.

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The fuel tap with the built in reserve tap, had the large nut as part of the fuel tap casting. Ace Classic sells this fuel tap as I bought one for my Dominator from them, and they do not sell rubbish parts. These fuel taps were also used on Triumph twins.

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All.

Working with the "buy the best and buy just once" motto, it looks like the Ace Classics £36 type it is then - I'm not brave enough to run without a reserve supply.

Regards, George.

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I bought one from Norvil for the 650SS and had a similar problem with fiddling under the tank and interfering with the frame. It was the same as the one I replaced it for but don't know if that was standard (push off, push on and reserve lever above the push bit). It was very 'sticky' in operation too, with high efforts required to push on and off. Almost sent it back but wore it in a bit and put a bit of oil on it and decided to live with it. No doubt I will  regret it.

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hello now 650ss had racing taps  and these do not have a reserve  like my ones on my Norton 650 Manxman  are Amal racing taps    I have no problem with them and my Manxman has the smaller tank, only 2.1/2 gallons  but you can tuck your knees in               yours  anna j  

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After seeing the Ace Classics tap, and realising that I would also need an outlet tube and nut, and the price was now at £50, I decided to adapt the BAP type tap I already had (modern fuel safe) to fit properly. The following is not for the purists, but for the riders.

I purchased from a plumbing shop a brass 1/4"BSP nipple, running nut and ferrule. The ferrule is 30mm long, so the perfect length to clear the frame tube. (See Parts 1)

I then soldered 1/3rd of the nipple into the ferrule to make a solid assembly.

I removed the filter from the tap and found it was a perfect 'snug' fit into the nipple (Assy 1).

I checked the length that the ‘main’ tube would need to be and bought some 4mm copper tube from a model shop. (See Parts 2). The tube was a light “tap” fit into the fuel tap, and was cut to length to suit.

I then assembled the tap onto the nipple/ferrule assy with a new washer, and then offered the assembly into the tank, with a new rubber/copper ‘crush’ washer above the nut.

I had to back off  ½ turn from fully in to get the tap pointing outwards, and nipped up the running nut.

Result? See Tap fitted pic. A fuel tap that does not leak, is accessable when riding and cost a total of £9 in parts.

The reserve supply volume I don't know yet, but the pipe extende into the main tank 27mm above the tap boss, so perhaps 2-3 litres is available - certainly better than no reserve!

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Looks like a classic example of why we do what we do. The biggest difference between work done by a professional craftsmen and a competent amateur is not the quality of the result but the time taken to get there! Maybe you should market that. All my fuel taps leak...

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Hi David, If you have one of the Ewarts single plunger  with reserve,I can usually fix these ,send it to me  Bob.I will PM my address.

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Thanks a lot, Robert! I have three bikes with nearly full tanks, but none with reserves! The cork sealed HexaGon type on the 16H, and lever ones on the Inter. I'll try and improve them...the Inter carb leak is a bigger problem to be sorted first. I just picked up some nice looking copper crush washers with genuine asbestos leaking out of there inside edges! Do I try them on the banjo? A moral and medical dilemma...

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Robert - banjo thickness: 0.521" one side, 0.524" the other.  3 thou out of parallel.  Now after a few minutes with 600 grade wet and dry on a flat surface it's within less than a thou.  So cautiously optimistic.

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Would'nt it be great if all fixes were that simple!, My Rudge leaks oil from every where ,its going to be a long slog.

 

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