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Decent SLS front shoes

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Has anyone got a recommendation for a supplier of  a set of shoes ?, They need to have steel facings and  linings that stop.  I will probably have to send them off for  re-lining  as  that seems the only way to get proper linings ,but it would be nice to not have to.  I need to have a spare set handy. Boxes marked Girling or Ferodo  will not do !!.

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I bought them for the Dommie from Russell Motors last time. It was some years ago. I think the old ones went in exchange. No steel involved as far as I remember,  apart from the cam bearing pads I think.

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Not thought of Russells,  Worth a try.   The last couple of sets I bought  had useless linings and soft  bearing pads that  wore out fast.

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I use these people for relining my shoes. About £23 including return postage. 

Once they bed in they are really good. As you say the Ferodo or Girling new are too hard and just don't work.

Paul

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Hi Paul,   I have not resolved this one yet ! , twas my plan to get VS   to fit some  of their gold oversize woven look linings to a set of spare shoes  so I could keep the bike  in action. I have been totally committed  to  roof repairs for weeks  , putting right the wrongs that the "PRO'S " did  30 years ago,  Now I find myself  having to finish off the  work of  the  guys that just left ! ,  All a bit much  at 75 ,  I have still got the head for heights  but the  joints  are well past  it , Now got a suntan to die for.

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Remember that the lining material is not the only factor that needs consideration in order to get good braking.  The condition of the inner drum surface and the brake plate cams are just as important. 

I had my Atlas drum skimmed and then the brake shoe linings trimmed to match. This was followed by the brake plate refurbished with new bushes and cams so that when operating the brake shoes were not pushed over to one side.

The difference in stopping performance was simply unbelieveable and made consideration of a 2LS plate a waste of time. 

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Hi Phil, The drum is perfect  but The cams  may have some wear due to  soft shoe ends that pick up abrasive particles and wear out the cams.  I agree a good SLS  is better than a  poor TLS. I always put the thicker shoe on the leading  position .and it seems to help after a little bedding in.

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I just moved the wheel from a single to try to improve the front brake. Put copperslip on the cams, did my best to clean the linings with brake cleaner, lightly abraded the drum, reassembled and it was worse. Backed off the brake plate retaining nut to help it self centre as I grabbed the lever and tightened to spindle nut and it's a bit better but not much. The linings were lathe turned to match the drum, and it's done about 1000 miles since new linings. So I give up...they are off to VS as soon as I can. But although I think they will turn them to size, that can't be done unless they are on the backplate, can it? And my lathe is not big enough.

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I have fitted a longer  stainless lever to the plate and regularly swap the shoes round ,they have steel slippers now that I made myself to reduce the slack . Works well but  its time for new ,better? linings.  I tried some of those gold woven look linings on the Atlas rear  (RGM)   and it went from totally useless to can lock up if needed.. Got to be worth a try. For some reason RGM dont  list these for the front.

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VS do not turn the lining to size, they determine the lining thickness from the dimensions you give them, OD of unlined shoes on brakeplate, ID of drum. They size the lining before bonding to shoes. Saftek do the same service.

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Thanks John. There is another important variable, which is where the pins fit. If the opposite ends from the cams were floating this wouldn't matter.

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I always machine the fixed ends so they float on the pins, it only needs a 1/4" flat to be effective. I use a milling cutter the same diameter on the pin and then with the shoe on the mill table I can give the 1/4" movement in the right axis of movement. The other option is to open out the central hole on the brakeplate and then hold the brake on as you tighten the axle nut so the shoes are central at the start, repeat as the uneven wear on the shoes changes the centre point.

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Opening out the axle hole was what Noton reccomended.I tried it and scrapped a perfect plate.Could not get the brake to come off cleanly.  Carefull with that.

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The reason I set up the TLS on my Dommie on the bench and not using the two spanner method is because I wanted it to start off concentric. The backplate hole is a bit oversize as per Norton recommendation but I knew when I fitted it that the spindle would be near enough in the middle of the hole when I held the lever on. I've never readjusted it in maybe 10k miles but it's pretty good. 

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As David mentions, you need to pull the front brake on tight when the axle spindle is still loose.  Keep them on (with an assistant if possible?) then tighten the spindle bolt/nut.  This should centre the brake unit with the hub.

 

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