Skip to main content
000000 000003 000006 000009 000012 000015 000018 000021 000024 000027 000030 000033 000036 000039 000042 000045 000048 000051 000054 000057 000060 000063 000066 000069 000072 000075 000078 000081 000084 000087 000090 000093 000096 000099 000102 000105 000108 000111 000114 000117 000120 000123 000126 000129 000132 000135 000138 000141 000144 000147 000150 000153 000156 000159 000162 000165 000168 000171 000174 000177 000180 000183 000186 000189 000192 000195 000198 000201 000204 000207 000210 000213 000216 000219 000222 000225 000228 000231 000234 000237 000240 000243 000246 000249 000252 000255 000258 000261 000264 000267 000270 000273 000276 000279 000282 000285 000288 000291 000294 000297 000300 000303 000306 000309 000312 000318 000321 000324 000327 000330 000333 000336 000339 000342 000345 000348 000351 000354 000357 000360 000363 000366 000369 000372 000375 000378 000381 000384 000387 000390 000393 000396 000399 000402 000405 000408 000411 000414 000417 000420 000423 000426 000429 000432 000435 000438 000441 000444 000447 000450 000453 000456 000459 000462 000465 000468 000471 000474 000477 000480 000483 000486 000489 000492 000495 000498 000501 000504 000507 000510 000513 000516 000519 000522 000525 000528 000531 000534 000537 000540 000543 000546 000549 000552 000555 000558 000561 000564 000567 000570 000573 000576 000579 000582 000585 000588 000591 000594 000597 000600 000603 000606 000609 000612 000615 000618 000621 000624 000627 000630 000633 000636 000639 000642 000645 000648 000651 000654 000657 000660 000663 000666 000669 000672 000675 000678 000681 000684 000687 000690 000693 000696 000699 000702 000705 000708 000711 000714 000717 000720 000723 000726 000729 000732 000735 000738 000741 000744 000747 000750 000753 000756 000759 000762 000765 000768 000771 000774 000777 000780 000783 000786 000789 000792 000795 000798 000801 000804 000807 000810 000813 000816 000819 000822 000825 000828 000831 000834 000837 000840 000843 000846 000849 000852 000855 000858 000861 000864 000867 000870 000873 000876 000879 000882
English French German Italian Spanish

Repairing a hole in the frame?

Forums

Hi,

Is it acceptable and safe to repair a small-ish hole in a frame? The reason I ask is that having rubbed down the frame on my Domi 99 project, I’ve discovered that the bottom rail has a hole in it about 8mm long by 3mm wide. It appears to be the result of corrosion as the metal around the hole is very thin. I am hoping that I can get the hole opened up a bit to remove any thin metal and then get a plate welded over the hole. Does that sound a sensible thing to do or is my frame just scrap metal now?

If anyone has any advice how I can repair the frame I’d very much appreciate that information.

Thanks

Regards

Tony

Permalink

That sounds serious.  Unless there was a very valid reason that rail was corroded due to  special circumstances I would suggest the other is in similar condition.

A good paint/ engineering shop will be able to measure the tube wall thickness.  Get the whole thing checked before you go further.  Then if necessary, get the tube replaced by a competent  engineer..

Don't skimp on it Tony, a repair is cheaper than another unknown quantity frame and a bad  repair out in the market place is an accident in the making.

 

I'm sure someone will give you details of the right "goto" company.

 

Regards

 

JOn

That is a comprehensive service,  I  think your answer is there Tony >

 

Cheers

 

Jon 

Hi Ian,

Thanks for that link - I’ve emailed Andover Norton to ask if the lower tubes will fit a slimline frame. I don’t have sufficient knowledge to know if the lower tubes are the same on wideline and slimline frames (but I hope they are as I found two holes in the other lower rail this afternoon).

If they do fit, the next problem will be finding a suitably skilled engineering person who can weld the new tubes in place and get the lug and bracket positions correct, but that’s ‘step 2’, I need to get the right answer from Andover before I worry about finding an engineer.

Thanks again for your help.

Regards

Tony

In reply to by jonathan_newton

Permalink

Hi Jon,

Yep that certainly looks promising - I just hope the wideline tubes are the same as slimline ones as my frame is a slimline.

Thanks again

Regards

Tony

Permalink

Hi Tony.

I think if you had blasted the frame, rather than rubbed it down, more holes, or larger ones, would have appeared. I seem to recall it is not unknown for Featherbed lower frame rails to rot out from the inside. Somehow moisture gets in there, and of course that is where it will end up, at the bottom..

Hopefully AN will provide the answers. I suspect they may suggest bronze welding, rather than MIG or TIG. It may require the services of a specialist frame builder, to whom no doubt it would not be a problem.

Do keep us posted. Good luck with it.

Ian

Permalink

Hi,

I would highly recommend approaching Norman White at Thruxton. He can do anything with frames - he replaced distorted sections of my Mk3 Commando frame front down tubes,  the entire rear loop and shock absorber mounting plates. Impossible to spot the repairs!

Andy 

Permalink

Hi Andy,

Thanks for that recommendation- sounds like  Norman White is worth a call.

Thanks

Regards

Tony

Permalink

I had exactly the same problem with my Slimline frame about 15 years ago. At the time I had a brazing attachment for my arc welding set and was able to add metal patches over the large holes and small blobs over the pin holes. This worked fine to start with but the internal rot  was well established and most of my repairs fell off within a year. I then headed off to see Dave Degens who had jigs to hold my frame firmly inline while the worst sections of tubing were cut out and replaced with new chunks. The repairs needed were extensive and expensive but done by an expert. I would suggest speaking with him first or Norman White as a good second choice. Attachment shows the weak areas of the Featherbed frame which apparently had a design fatigue life of only 150,000 miles.

Permalink

Hi Philip,

Thanks for the info re Dave Degens - I didn’t realise he was still building bikes.

That drawing you attached showing the frame’s weak points is interesting as my frame has holes in most of the locations indicated, but luckily no crack near the headstock. That point of water ingress by the rear footrest bracket is strange because on my frame it looks like those brackets are simply but-welded to the frame tube so how does water get into the tube? Having said that though, on one of the frame tubes there is a crack just at the point where the top of the footrest bracket is welded to the tube - I guess that would allow moisture into that tube. However, the other side of the frame also has holes on the lower rail but there is no crack at the footrest bracket or anywhere else in that tube so I don’t know how the moistures got in on that side. Worrying that the service limit of the frame is 150,000 miles as my frame looks like it’s already got a high mileage on it.

Regards

Tony

Permalink

Water is weird stuff. On a certain bridge  the crash barrier posts were toe to toe welded steel 6" ×3" channels instead of square hollow sections. One winter, some of the posts split. They were full of water and froze overnight. Water vapour must have got in, and condensed, simply through the weld defects (which are always there...). Over a long time  some had filled up. On a cold day, those with water could be seen by the dew on the outside. Some were completely full of water even though they were fully sealed by welds.

Permalink

As PH has mentioned, is it totally critical to get the whole frame cleaned back and the whole of it inspected. Since my time in AN I have heard of a few Commando frames that have 'suffered light frontal' thankfully two were found once stripped back, one was straightened and coated and being used to build a bike, thankfully noticed that when the cradle was fitted the wheel alignment was wrong further investigation found the frame had cracked away from the repair area. All three were scrap.

Just because the front is not that badly damaged does not mean the rear of the frame is not, check the loops behind the gearbox, they may look OK, but may well be cracked.  

Another good tip, if and when you have the parts off your bike for minor repairs / maintenance check the frame and welds that are normally hidden.  

about 2 years ago I took a twisted frame over to him, he was still working from behind his house with an assistant.

He's attended a couple of NOC "do's" this year so I guess he is still active.The place is quite tucked away...still has a website but very little info here...http://www.dresda.co.uk/

 

 

Norton Owners Club Website by White-Hot Design

Privacy Policy