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Brace yourself chaps,video contains nasty content

Just Feel for this fella , at the oringinal tea hut ,Epping forest https://t.co/udxPbpRVAx

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hi chaps,

not a pretty sight. I feel sorry for the guy on his V4. My street has been in and out of the dealers now twice since June , a total of four weeks and all to do with two oil leaks faulty fuelling (its had to be remapped) an earth lead fell off the battery and the reflector has fallen off a fork leg. Do you know what has finally done it for me, the ridiculous turning circle, it’s almost tipped me off in circumstances not dissimilar to the man with the V4 three times. I have done 600 miles on the bike and can honestly say in 51 years of biking it is by far the worst bike I’ve ever owned. You’ve guessed it , it is up for sale as of yesterday. I will stick to the old Dominator and my old Commando.

David

hello all,

I didn’t test the Norton before I bought and in fact have very rarely test ridden bikes before I’ve bought relying on test reports and other people’s opinions before making an educated guess which on this occasion has let me down badly!!!! I’ve ridden various v twins of a certain make for 30years ( amongst many before that) and despite what people may think of them I can honestly say I’ve never had to return to the dealers for so many faults in one bike in fact in any bike!

david

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shame u decided to out the 961,u may get an acceptable price on a trade in,the euro 4 bikes do seem to be inconsistent in reliability,really good & faultless to really bad & multiple faults,& when all ur mates know u got a new bike they want to hear about ,it’s not easy trying to defend it,disappointment should not be an option 

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I seem to have a good 961 which I continue to enjoy hugely - early bike delivered late 2012. Has always run reliably with the only failures being a duff indicator flasher unit where Norton sent me a spare plus duff main beam and starter relays which I replaced with parts bought online. Also have two 850 Commandos but the 961 is always first choice for a long ride.  

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What has all this got to do with this poor chap who fell of his V4? He will be feeling even poorer when he gets the repair bill; double 'Ouch'!

Unfortunately race rep-type machines are very susceptible to low speed tumbles, given the limited steering lock. I nearly did the same thing once on my Benelli Tornado as I pulled up outside a bike dealers, maneuvering to park. I just managed to save it, but embarrassing all the same. At least I didn't have someone pointing a video camera at me when it (nearly) happened!

Commiserations to whoever he is. Anyone on here? C'mon, own up!

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It looks like he has applied throttle to get the bike upright out of the turn and the engine management / traction control has sad no, and malfunctioned.catching him unaware. 

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I recall that a few years ago, one motorcycle magazine declared 'drop costs' as part of their bike reviews/tests i.e. how much to expect to pay if he bike fell over/was dropped for whatever reason. I recall touring Beemers came out at circa £700 - my K100RS was knocked over whilst parked up by a reversing taxi and it cost £800 to correct ( the taxi driver's insurance paid-up fortunately) - that was circa 20 years ago!

 

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The bike starts to die on him and then tries more throttle but to no avail. 

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I have also dropped my Anniversary cafe racer outside my house and mine was a lack of steering lock.I also have a J P N which has a better lock than the new bike

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I found the steering lock was limited when I first got my Sport but four and a half years later and no dropsies I adjusted my riding style to suit the machine.

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My worst injuries ever on a motorcycle was when I tried to make a sharp turn in 5 mph entering the pits after a race. Blame the limited angle before lock on that racer. No cost to repair the bike as it landed on my knee.

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My most embarrassing drop was in my backyard in Melbourne, I pulled my G3l matchless out from under the house and put it on the side stand, I turned to close the door and the side stand buried itself into the soft lawn and the bike fell over in slow motion.

I tried everything I could think of to extract it. in the end I had to go to the garden shed and get a shovel. I dug a very large hole in the lawn until I could fold the side stand back an get the bike upright. Fortunately I was alone, even if I had an audience no amount of assistance could have saved me from having to dig the bike out.

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Getting on for thirty years ago I rode my brand-new Pan European home from the dealership, switched off and 'paddled' it backwards into my garage. Sat there for a moment, feet down while I adjusted the mirrors into their best position for me then dismounted to the left, lowering the extremely heavy bike on to the sidestand that I'd already put down. Except that I hadn't.

By the time the penny dropped, so did the bike, right on top of me. There was an almighty crash as the knock-off mirror housing hit the garage wall (doing no damage to the housing but a great deal to my composure as I obviously thought I'd smashed my new bike).

Now I was in a bit of a pickle, trapped under what seemed like a ton-and-a-half of Japanese engineering with no one else around. Wonderful stuff, panic-induced adrenalin; giving an almighty heave, of which Geoff Capes himself would have been proud, I somehow managed to raise the bike high enough to allow me to wriggle upright 'twixt bike and garage wall to the point where I could wrestle the leviathan back into a near-vertical position and belatedly deploy that b****y sidestand!

It wasn't the last time that I dropped that particular bike, the other occasion was when I stalled the engine as I attempted to pull out at a, fortunately, deserted tee-junction somewhere in the East End; a pssing taxi-driver merely chortled at my predicament through his open window, bless his cockney sense of humour. Again, adrenalin, fuelled this time by embarrassment, came to my rescue and I was able to resume the vertical and my journey home.

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Spent a year as a military dispatch rider. On an early winter night ride from point A to point B, i misread the map. A thin line could either be a footpath or a small stream. After half a mile in that stream full of boulders, I had a fall and got stuck under the bike in the middle of nowhere. The feeling of ice cold water up to my waist was not pleasant. Took what seemed to be an eternity, but probably only half an hour, to get my foot loose. Luckily both the map and my torch wasn't drowned. Return in the stream without further problems. Took two days for the leathers to dry.

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Thanks, Mikael; it's reassuring to be reminded that there's always someone worse off than yourself - at least I remained dry and warm (a bit too warm, as I recall) throughout my crash landings!

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Hello I do not believe that this footage was taken out of context it was just unfortunate for his owner to have this incident it could turn out to of been more serious than it was I do hope he was OK and no damage done to the bike.  He will not forget this experience  yours Anna j

 

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