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Scottoiler

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I have the long term loan of a top of the range oiler. Interested hearing from anyone who has fitted one. The bike is a 99DL with fully enclosed chaincase,so its a bit different to usual.They are also mostly fitted to bikes that don't have a brake drum, I can fit the nozzle to discharge close to the back face of the sprocket very close to the root of the teeth.Don't think the front face of the sprocket is safe,too close to the brakeplate.The system is very techy , powered by 12v it electrically  automatically  controls the adjustable flow and senses that the bike is being used or not.So its fit and forget for months or years if not used much.There is also a control panel that can sit on the bars . Its come off an MT09 and seemingly eliminated wear and maintenance.

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Hi, Robert.

Some years ago I fitted a Scottoiler, though not the electronic top of the range you seem to have, to my Aprilia Falco. I found it worked really well in keeping wear and adjustment down and keeping the chain clean. I subsequently fitted a much cheaper, Tutoro (only £20 back in 2010), oiler to my 650SS. This is basically a plastic tube reservoir with a metering outlet valve and tubing to the sprocket, and whilst it can't monitor whether the engine is running or not, or flow more oil the higher the engine is revving, like the Scottoiler,  it still does a reasonable job at keeping the chain wear free and clean. Whilst you are slightly better off than most, having a fully enclosed chainguard, I would still recommend fitting the oiler if you can get it to fit. Mine are fitted to direct the oil on to the outside of the sprocket at the root of the teeth at around the 7 o'clock position and seem to work fine there, with the rotation of the wheel causing the oil to migrate into the chain links. No problems with the rear brake drum on the 650SS and none at all with the Aprilia as its disc is on the other side.

It will give you a little project to work on!

Regards.

 

 

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Hi Robert. I fitted a basic Scottoiler on a modern Triumph some years back. It was operated by the vac in the carbs. It certainly did the job in keeping the chain in good nick, and it even 'helped' lubricating the back tyre if you set it up badly. Apart from that early slip up no other problem. I've even toyed with fitting one to my 1960 Domi myself.

Rgds

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 Cheers guys, considering the cost and often quality issues with replacement drum/sprocket I'm surprised there is not more of us. The quality of the originals must be something special as they have survived so well.I will be running the feed along the swinging arm behind the chaincase brackets and onto the back face of the sprocket. The only awkward part is having to check and adjust the feed when altering the chain tension.

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Given the fact that the Norton has a brake plate in the way of fitting an oil delivery pipe, you may find it easier to deliver the oil to the lower chain run, just behind the gearbox sprocket. 

On my BSA Super Rocket  I took a plastic pipe from the oil tank breather down to the lower run of the final drive chain, behind the gearbox sprocket.  It kept the chain mildly damp, automatically. Note to self, do this to the Dominator!

I had a vacuum-controlled Scott-oiler on a Honda for many years.  I took the rubber inlet tract off and drilled a hole in its top to fit the brass vacuum nipple.  The Scott-oiler body clamped to a frame member and I fitted the delivery pipe to run oil down the side of the sprocket.  Seeing as how the Honda had a small sump and needed an oil change every 1000 miles, I ran used engine oil in my Scottoiler on a high feed rate.   Cheapskate!  But it greatly improved chain life.

Paul

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Would these work on primary chains just as well?  PO on one of my machines decided to rely on primary chain spray lubrication alone, and leave the oil bath empty.  The bike has yet to be tested on a proper long run, but I am suspicious and intend to replace the oil bath oil.  But why does the primary need and receive so much better treatment than the rear chain?  Both transmit the same power, although i recognise the rear chain has a higher tension (and lower speed).

Of course the oil from a primary chain oiler will end up inside the 'dry' chain case, and drip on the floor as usual!

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I fitted a Scottoiler to a bike I used for courier work back in the '80s, it literally doubled the life of chain and sprockets – I can say that because, doing such high mileage and doing my own maintenance, I kept records of work I'd done on the bike (I've still got them). When I bought a new Triumph in 2000, about the first thing I did was fit a Scottoiler. Well worth it.

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One reason why the final drive chain usually didn't get enclosed is because it takes more effort, cost and weight to make a cover which will fully shroud the chain, and allow chain servicing and wheel removal.  Norton tried it in the late '50s and found that it did not improve chain life.  I think the verdict was that there is a long open gap at the front, around the final drive sprocket, and grit got into the case and got held there.

By contrast, a pivoted fork Ariel or BSA has shrouding around the gearbox sprocket, and greatly benefits from an enclosed chaincase - or a good guard.  My Super Rocket had a guard with an inner blade which passed down between wheel and chain, and kept the muck and water off the lower run, ensuring good protection.

In the '80s I ran a Suzuki GS450 with a Peter Furlong accessory chaincase, made of grp.  The chief mechanic in a major bike shop saw it, and told me to take it off, as it would cause the chain to overheat and the lubricant to boil off.  Er, no, it didn't.  It did an excellent job of keeping the chain clean, and greatly increased chain life. I cut a hole for a rubber bung just in front of the rear sprocket, and fed chain oil onto it every hundred miles or so.

Paul

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Fitted one to my 88 with the pincer type delivery end mounted at about 7o'clock so it oils both sides of the sprocket - not really needed as capillary action pulls oil into the rollers. It works with a bob weight flopping about and releasing oil whenever the bike moves, so the more the bike moves, the more oil it delivers, and you can control the flow with a valve. No drilling of the inlet manifold and a simple but effective system. I'm impressed enough to plan to fit one to the 650 as well.

 

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