Skip to main content
000000 000001 000002 000003 000004 000005 000006 000007 000008 000009 000010 000011 000012 000013 000014 000015 000016 000017 000018 000019 000020 000021 000022 000023 000024 000025 000026 000027 000028 000029 000030 000031 000032 000033 000034 000035 000036 000037 000038 000039 000040 000041 000042 000043 000044 000045 000046 000047 000048 000049 000050 000051 000052 000053 000054 000055 000056 000057 000058 000059 000060 000061 000062 000063 000064 000065 000066 000067 000068 000069 000070 000071 000072 000075 000078 000081 000084 000087 000090 000093 000096 000099 000102 000105 000108 000111 000114 000117 000120 000123 000126 000129 000132 000135 000138 000141 000144 000147 000150 000153 000156 000159 000162 000165 000168 000171 000174 000177 000180 000183 000186 000189 000192 000195 000198 000201 000204 000207 000210 000213 000216 000219 000222 000225 000228 000231 000234 000237 000240 000243 000246 000249 000252 000255 000258 000261 000264 000267 000270 000273 000276 000279 000282 000285 000288 000291 000294 000297 000300 000303 000306 000309 000312 000318 000321 000324 000327 000330 000333 000336 000339 000342 000345 000348 000351 000354 000357 000360 000363 000366 000369 000372 000375 000378 000381 000384 000387 000390 000393 000396 000399 000402 000405 000408 000411 000414 000417 000420 000423 000426 000429 000432 000435 000438 000441 000444 000447 000450 000453 000456 000459 000462 000465 000468 000471 000474 000477 000480 000483 000486 000489 000492 000495 000498 000501 000504 000507 000510 000513 000516 000519 000522 000525 000528 000531 000534 000537 000540 000543 000546 000549 000552 000555 000558 000561 000564 000567 000570 000573 000576 000579 000582 000585 000588 000591 000594 000597 000600 000603 000606 000609 000612 000615 000618 000621 000624 000627 000630 000633 000636 000639 000642 000645 000648 000651 000654 000657 000660 000663 000666 000669 000672 000675 000678 000681 000684 000687 000690 000693 000696 000699 000702 000705 000708 000711 000714 000717 000720 000723 000726 000729 000732 000735 000738 000741 000744 000747 000750 000753 000756 000759 000762 000765 000768 000771 000774 000777 000780 000783 000786 000789 000792 000795 000798 000801 000804 000807 000810 000813 000816 000819 000822 000825 000828 000831 000834 000837 000840 000843 000846 000849 000852 000855 000858 000861 000864 000867 000870 000873 000876 000879 000882 000883 1.slide1 2.slide2 3.slide3 4.slide4 5.slide5
English French German Italian Spanish

Oil return line

Forums

Would somone be kind enough to explaine to me how the returning oil from the pump is in part diverted to become chain lubricant ? What regulates the flow?  Thanks Ian

Permalink

I have to say that I think Gordon is wrong; neither of the Commandos I have owned have had anything resembling the fitting he describes.

Rather, the flow to the chain is "controlled" by the bit of felt (28) stuffed into the length of clear plastic tube (29).

On my present bike the outlet has been blocked off, as I gather most owners do these days; my memory of the machine I had 40 years ago is that this was not necessary, as the felt gradually silted up with detritus suspended in the oil (some will recall that Velocette, among others more progressive than Norton, fitted felt filters in the main return feed on both the LE and Viper/Venom series).

Permalink

Julian,

thanks for your comment, I've been known to be wrong before.

 

Please allow me to draw your attention to the chain oiler in the link below, it's identical to the one which was fitted to my 850 MK 2 (which I have owned from new).

Norton Commando 750 850 Chain oiler and Regulator NR! | #149408717 (worthpoint.com)

 

As you can see the thumb screw clip I referred to compresses the clear plastic tube and felt thereby regulating the oil flow to the chain.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Permalink

Pity, as it is an amusing piece to talk over in the pub, (remember them?). Not as amusing as the Velo story though..... 

Jon

 

 

Permalink

Best done with clean thick oil with old paint brush or specialist chain sprays.

Acids and condensation from combustion process are not good for chains.

So many owners blank the original system.

Permalink

My 1974 Roadster had the thumbscrew device to squeeze the plastic, but it fell apart when I tried to tighten it and the tube had got very hard. Blocked it off and fitted a Scotoiler.

Permalink

Dear Julian,

good to read your comments again.

You may recall that back in the days when many of us purchased new Commandos we were presented with the excellent factory published 'Norton Commando riders manual'.

From page 19  "Rear chain lubrication" we read this:-

"The rear chain is lubricated by a pipe with felt restrictor from the rear of the oil tank.

The flow can be reduced or cut off as desired by a compression type adjuster on the pipe. After use, ensure that the adjuster is clear of the battery and all electrical components".

 

Below for your enjoyment, a PDF copy of the manual:-

https://www.motos-anglaises.com/manuels/norton/manuel_norton_1973_commando-850_anglais.pdf

 

Hope this helps solve your mystery.

 

Kind regards

Gordon

Permalink

Gordon,

That link is very helpful, and clearly demonstrates that 1973 850s are supposed to have an adjustable feed to the rear chain from the oil return pipe.

This prompted me to have a look at my copies of the earlier Riders Manuals. To be precise, I consulted

  1. an early undated edition covering early models, part number 062864
  2. a later edition, also undated but covering models from engine number 220000, part number 064135
  3. the 1973 850 manual provided by Gordon, part number 065321

Rear chain lubrication is dealt with on page 19 of all three publications.

Working from last to first, the 850 Manual contains the text quoted by Gordon. Note that this does not illustrate the adjuster or specify its location.

The #220000-on manual has this:

Non-adjustabe rear chain oiler

The earliest manual, however, not only specifies the existence of an adjuster, but provides an illustration:

Rear chain oiler adjuster

As can be seen, this is nothing like the part that Gordon has, and is located down by the chain just above the Z-plate.

Permalink

Have a clause that "specification may change due to ongoing developments" or something like it to cover differences between handbooks and what was actually fitted. 

Add in that NVT as it was when the 850 came out was living on the breadline, I'm sure that they would fit whatever they could get.

Biggest surprise was that they continued to fit an oiler when they could easily have deleted it (like everyone else had done) and pocketed the money it cost.

Permalink

Dear Julian,

thank you so much for the information regarding Commando chain oilers.

Unfortunately, I must confess to be somewhat less enthused about them having removed mine over forty years ago.

However for the sake of general interest and your research purposes I have unearthed the offending article and attach a photo for your perusal.

I trust perhaps you will now be able to reconcile the text from the riders manual with the article in the attached photo?

 

Do please kindly report back to us when your research is concluded.

 

All the best

Gordon 

 

Attachments
Permalink

Next research step … but perhaps left to someone directly interested (a museum curator, perhaps) — discuss with Andover Norton.

As far as I can see from looking at the relevant pages, AN do not list either the early type illustrated in the relevant Riders Manual, nor the later type which Gordon has provided pictures of, nor is either type evident in the diagrams.

Given their evidently completist attitude to stocking spares, I'm slightly surprised at this omission. I wonder if anyone (a) knows the part numbers for each version (b) has drawings of them.  

Permalink

I hadn't intended to re-visit this topic, but when recently searching RGM's website for a cam chain adjuster tool I happened upon the elusive item in question.

As existence of this item seems to have been questioned on this thread, it's perhaps appropriate to record it here for posterity:-

06 4875 Chain oiler compressor adjuster.

https://www.rgmnorton.co.uk/buy/chain-oiler-compressor-adjuster_1246.htm 

Also listed by Norvil and Oldbritts.

The Norton Commando Factory parts list 06 5034 also lists the item on the lower part of the 'group 16 page' although it's not illustrated.

 

Also from the excellent factory Commando service sheets, page 163 tells us this:-

"An adjuster facility has been added to the rear chain oiler regulator assembly (from engine introduction number 302000) by means of an additional clamp, part number 064875.

The clamp is in the form of a compression clip, and is applicable to all previous Commando models utilising rear chain oiler regulator assembly 061669".

 

https://www.nortonownersclub.org/sites/default/files/2019-02/Norton%20Commando%20Service%20Sheets%20%28indexed%29.pdf

 

IMHO

the above service sheets are well worth perusing in their entirety.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norton Owners Club Website by White-Hot Design

Privacy Policy