Skip to main content
000000 000003 000006 000009 000012 000015 000018 000021 000024 000027 000030 000033 000036 000039 000042 000045 000048 000051 000054 000057 000060 000063 000066 000069 000072 000075 000078 000081 000084 000087 000090 000093 000096 000099 000102 000105 000108 000111 000114 000117 000120 000123 000126 000129 000132 000135 000138 000141 000144 000147 000150 000153 000156 000159 000162 000165 000168 000171 000174 000177 000180 000183 000186 000189 000192 000195 000198 000201 000204 000207 000210 000213 000216 000219 000222 000225 000228 000231 000234 000237 000240 000243 000246 000249 000252 000255 000258 000261 000264 000267 000270 000273 000276 000279 000282 000285 000288 000291 000294 000297 000300 000303 000306 000309 000312 000318 000321 000324 000327 000330 000333 000336 000339 000342 000345 000348 000351 000354 000357 000360 000363 000366 000369 000372 000375 000378 000381 000384 000387 000390 000393 000396 000399 000402 000405 000408 000411 000414 000417 000420 000423 000426 000429 000432 000435 000438 000441 000444 000447 000450 000453 000456 000459 000462 000465 000468 000471 000474 000477 000480 000483 000486 000489 000492 000495 000498 000501 000504 000507 000510 000513 000516 000519 000522 000525 000528 000531 000534 000537 000540 000543 000546 000549 000552 000555 000558 000561 000564 000567 000570 000573 000576 000579 000582 000585 000588 000591 000594 000597 000600 000603 000606 000609 000612 000615 000618 000621 000624 000627 000630 000633 000636 000639 000642 000645 000648 000651 000654 000657 000660 000663 000666 000669 000672 000675 000678 000681 000684 000687 000690 000693 000696 000699 000702 000705 000708 000711 000714 000717 000720 000723 000726 000729 000732 000735 000738 000741 000744 000747 000750 000753 000756 000759 000762 000765 000768 000771 000774 000777 000780 000783 000786 000789 000792 000795 000798 000801 000804 000807 000810 000813 000816 000819 000822 000825 000828 000831 000834 000837 000840 000843 000846 000849 000852 000855 000858 000861 000864 000867 000870 000873 000876 000879 000882
English French German Italian Spanish

Original Girling Master Cylinder Reservoir Bellows

Forums

5 Aug 2020

Re: Original Girling Master Cylinder Reservoir Bellows

To the Fold:

My 1974 850 Dunstall/Commando has the original Girling Master cylinder and it was fitted with a rubber "bellows" type insert to balance the brake fluid. Is anyone reproducing this piece? I realize that the newer replacement piece probably works just fine, but it is an esthetic thing for me. Basically it looks pretty neat so why change a design that functions well to begin with. Sorry that I do not have an image of the piece to share. For those not familiar with this thing it literally is a bellowed insert much like a circular accordion. The flanged top edge seals the reservoir cap. That is all I have for now. I look forward to your replies.

Regards,

David Huss

CONUS

6 Aug 2020

Re: Original Girling Bellows

Dearest Katherine,

It seems like yesterday frolicking in the dale; counting backwards in Swahili, good times!!! But I digress. Thanks for guiding me to the schematic graphic of the bellows that I described. So back to my original question. Has anyone reproduced this piece or any NOS available someplace in "Norton-Land". Thanks again kiddo. I part with these famous words of mine: "If at first you don't succeed at least you succeeded at that." Feel free to use anytime you like or not.

Regards,

David Huss

CONUS

 

 

Permalink

You are missing that the current part in the Andover Norton photo does not match the original part. The current AN one has flat but tapered sides like a cone, the original had parallel sides but like fork gaitors had ribs as per the AN part sketch from the factory parts book.

7 Aug 2020

Re: Original Girling Bellows

Tony,

Le me splan it to ya.  I am aware of the newer bellows that are currently available. I do not wish to use that particular modification in my restoration project. Please note that I am seeking information or access to NOS kits that have the "older style" bellows. I hope that this clarifies your missed point. I appreciate the interest in my dilemma.(For those that think it is spelled "dilemna", what can I say. Really do not care.) Back to the commentary, but wait a brief musical interlude (insert "The Girl from Ipanema").--------------------------------------------------------------------(end song, continue chit-chat.) As I was saying thank you for the interest. Hopefully someone within this community can guide me in the correct direction.

Regards,

David Huss

CONUS

7 Aug 2020

Re:Original Girling Bellows

Mr. Holmes,

Being that a picture is worth a thousand words and I could possibly write a thousand words, then yes I am aware that the image does not match the currently produced part. Come on guys you are killing me here! Certainly somewhere in the British Isles with all the vintage motorcycles that exist and all the "Mom & Pop" or Crazy Uncle Frank repair shops there is an "old style" bellows sitting on the shelf. I am merely asking for a little help. So what do you say fella "Nortonistas"!!! It has been real, but I must get back to work even though I am the boss. I truly hope that I have clarified things. Best to all and stop thinking so much!

Regards,

David Huss

CONUS 

 

Permalink

Exactly why, or what is it that makes you want an original, or original copy? Doesn't the currently supplied one work as well? What if the newer design works even better than the original?

Just wondering.

Regards,

George.

 

Permalink

9 Aug 2020

Re: Original Girling Bellows-The Saga Continues

Hey There My Man George,

Thanks for the reply. As you all remember from the last episode; The Daring yet casually debonair raconteur Dave ventured forth on the noble pursuit of the "Every Illusive" Original Girling Master Cylinder Reservoir Bellows. DUN DUN DUNNNNN!!!! Guided by well-minded Nortonistas the trek has seen its ups and downs. We catch up with our trekker as he encounters the "most feared" and treacherous Why-ya-wanna-do-dat-for-asaurus. I would be lying to you if I said this was not a terrifying encounter. Yet, out of nowhere that fragrant aroma of success, some call it “Epiphany for Men” others just say something nondescript. The ever curious behemoth was taken back when in he learned that the original bellows, albeit rare, was part of the factory install on Dave’s 1974 850 Commando. The quest to restore the Commando to original condition is a worthwhile endeavor and the extra time to locate the desired piece will have its benefits. That being said the two adversaries parted ways; promising to write occasionally or at least think about it. This concludes the adventure as other treks are on the horizon. It has been real folks.  Will cherish the comradeship for some time to come.

P.S. I located the part here in the States. Thanks again for all the interest and tolerating my commentaries.

Regards & Best To All-“LONG LIVE NORTON”,

David Huss

CONUS

Permalink

I would argue that the 'new' style bellows is superior. It can be folded up to, effectively, a flat disc (you do install them this way, don't you?). Thus it displaces less fluid that the original bellows-style which always projects further down into the reservoir body.. Allowing more fluid in the reservoir - which is a good thing.

Permalink

23Aug20

Re: Bellows-New versus Old

Mr. T,

Thanks for the reply concerning the master cylinder bellows. Sometimes new is not preferred as is the case with my '74 Norton. When the hydraulics and its components where designed and installed by the factory all worked very well. It has worked very well since. I believe in the "purity of intent" as it may apply to my situation. That being said restoring the bike to its original form is the game plan. "Don't fix what ain't broke" to coin the rural vernacular. I will stick with the "old style" bellows as long as I can locate them.

As for the fluid level once the system has been purged and pressure to the caliper has been maintained all is good. I check the reservoir level and top off the fluid as required, no problems ever encountered. Messing with the vintage stuff is very satisfying especially when the original components still function. Enough said on the subject.

Do you know what the Letter and Number code found on the 19" Dunlop WM2 rims designates? I have MB41 on my rims. I have seen another variation out there with MC275. Just wondering!

 

Thanks again,

David Huss

CONUS

 

 

 

Permalink

The newer bellows, folds correctly as per the instructions from Lockheed who made the original master cylinder. How old is the rubber on the original you have. 

Permalink

25Aug20

 

Re: Bellows-New versus Old

Mr. Cutler or Miss Cutler (Being ignorant of which may apply),

Anyway. To answer your question the current bellows is probably from 1980. It was from inventory that I purchased several years ago. I keep all the old rubber pieces coated in talcum powder(unscented) to keep the moisture from damaging the material and away from any heat sources as best that I can. The "rubber dixie-cup" style replacement was available, but I did not like the looks of the thing so I never bought any. I ask that you refer to my earlier comments about this subject. I am trying in good faith to convey the point of not liking the "newer" version. Please honor my wishes and stop promoting the "damn thing". I have no desire to use them. Once again I wish to thank all who have replied and shown interest in the subject. The dialog has been interesting and no malice or hard feelings should be ever be felt or assumed.

Best to All,

David Huss

CONUS

Permalink

The new version (the design of which is decades old now) will be cheaper to produce as the tooling cost for moulding is a simpler design. The new version allows a higher level of brake fluid to be contained in the reservoir so giving a greater margin of safety/time in the event of a fluid leak when out riding.

I wonder if your penchant for 'originality' includes the chromed discs that wear unevenly, rock hard 1980 tyres that will invalidate your insurance in the event of a crash, Amal carbs that will be worn out. Wiring that will be rock hard and all the other things that age does to these machines.

Live in the modern age, and stop shouting  

 

Permalink

Some wheels that came with/from my Dommie (NOT on it- it got new ones!) that still have ancient tyres installed and air from the 1970's in them. I guess these will be most valuable for someone wanting 'original', even down to the air! 

Where this could potentially lead to is where someone is happy to use, or actually wants, for example, the 'widowmaker' frame or  other pieces that were upgraded due to safety or service concerns just to have it 'as it came out of the crate in 1967 or whenever.

This is where I get completely lost on the 100 point perfect rebuilds. I like to ride my bikes and just like 'back in the day', if something is/was available that made riding the bike better, we fitted it, whether that was new (better) tyres, boyer ignition, converting to disc brakes, Dunstall exhausts, Craven racks and top boxes etc  etc. I still abide by that philosophy today on all my bikes.

But as David implies, each to their own. I'm sure an old bellows isn't going to cause an accident. 

Would be a very boring place if everyone did exactly the same as everyone else. 

Regards, George. 

Permalink

To be fair to our friend, he was asking where he could obtain *new* parts to the old design. So sniping about 40 year old tyres etc. isn't appropriate. That he is determined to use a component that cannot be seen by anyone when the bike is assembled rather than one has been refined, improved and is readily available is, let's say, unusual. But he's not doing harm to himself or anyone else.

It occurs to me that some Brembo master cylinders use the concertina style of bellows, admittedly in a much deeper revervoir. I wonder whether they'd fit: https://www.motorworks.co.uk/vlive/Shop/Parts.php?T=6&Q=BRA57603

26 Aug 20

 

Re: The New Version

Petey,

Step away from the edge-its going to be alllllright.!!! Thank you for bringing me up to speed on manufacturing practices and design philosophy. You really got me there with the penchant reference about chrome discs and rock hard tyres. Lest I forget the worn-out Amal carbs and other deteriorated bits and pieces. What a devastating blow to my ego. Give me a moment to recover as I may need a "group hug". Fat chance. Now back to the "World According to Petey". Yes I do retain the chrome front disc and it works pretty good. I have found that a trued & balanced wheel prevents a massive amount of wear irregularity. But, wait there is more. That's right Petey ol'boy. I do live in the modern age contrary to  the belief of some of those out there. And I do prefer "old" over "new" in most cases as I have found that appreciating what was before helps guide you through the present. Thanks for the interest and concern. I hope that my  "shouting" did not render any permanent damage to your enlightened nature.

Regards,

David Huss

CONUS

 

In reply to by george_farenden

Permalink

26 Aug 20

 

Re: I have..............

George,

What a thoughtful response. Most appreciated. Let me clarify that I am not attempting a "100%" restore. The bike was "100%" only once in its life and never will be again. I am a purest for certain things all the others will be what they are. Thank you again. I will hoist one to you this evening.

Regards,

David_Huss

CONUS

26 Aug 20

Re:To be fair to our friend, he........

ST,

I may be doing a fair portion of "hoisting" this evening thanks to you and George. There is a logic to my madness and it takes all my time. You are spot-on with the Brembo bellows; the PS15 seems to be a fair match. There is also a unit provided by Grimeca that has promise. I was fortunate to have acquired the NOS Lockheed kits a few years ago. That is all for now. Thank you again. What a great time I am having with this organization.

Regards,

David Huss

CONUS

 

26 Aug 20

Re:To be fair to our friend, he........

ST,

I may be doing a fair portion of "hoisting" this evening thanks to you and George. There is a logic to my madness and it takes all my time. You are spot-on with the Brembo bellows; the PS15 seems to be a fair match. There is also a unit provided by Grimeca that has promise. I was fortunate to have acquired the NOS Lockheed kits a few years ago. That is all for now. Thank you again. What a great time I am having with this organization.

Regards,

David Huss

CONUS

 

 

Norton Owners Club Website by White-Hot Design

Privacy Policy