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Gasket removal

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Gasket removal

Posted by allen_hanford at December 03. 2018

Trying to get the last of the base gasket off the aluminum cases of my 1971 750. I've done this before but never found a satisfactory way of removing them. I watched a Permatex video online, bought their products and followed their directions. Totally worthless. I've also tried brake cleaner and acetone, also without success. All of these solvents were followed with a plastic scraper that was made for the job.

Am I missing something or is this job impossible?

Re: Gasket removal

Posted by ian_soady at December 04. 2018

I have 2 methods: first is a scraper I made out of an old mechanical hacksaw blade (about 1.5" across) in the far-off days when I worked in places that had such things. The second is one of those scrapers that takes a single sided razor blade. They're sold for cleaning halogen / ceramic hobs.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CERAMIC-HOB-TILE-OVEN-SCRAPER-5-EXTRA-BLADES-UK-MANUFACTURED-/263494242311

I always take the studs out when removing gaskets as the hard bit is getting rid of the bit around the stud.

Re: Gasket removal

Posted by john_holmes at December 04. 2018

I use a stanley knife blade held in a holder for scraping paint off glass, very similar to the hob cleaner Ian uses. Held at a shallow angle it goes under the gasket and removes it cleanly except when close to a stud hole if the alloy is pulled up..

Re: Gasket removal

Posted by robert_tuck at December 04. 2018

A hot air gun may help and its worth removing studs to check the surrounding alloy has not been pulled up. A handheld countersink is usefull to clear this.

Re: Gasket removal

Posted by allen_hanford at December 05. 2018

I have used the razor blade but couldn't get the residue underneath the paper without gouging the surface. I wish I'd thought of the heat gun. I'll try that next time.

I'm anticipating howls of derision, but I ended up using a Dremel tool with a scotchbrite pad. The finest pad with the slowest speed gave me a controllable result. The motor is still in the bike so I can't check it with a surface plates but I'm pretty confident I'll get a nice seal.

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