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Rear Shocks

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Rear Shocks

Posted by Andrew Wibmer at June 11. 2018

Hello,

still getting old paint off, looking at my rear shocks, they "seem" fine but might be stuffed - difficult to tell. Does anyone know how to assess them and if they can be dissaembled / serviced - at least to get the shrouds off to paint. Thought I would ask before risking a loud ping and bits going everywhere.

Re: Rear Shocks

Posted by dennis_thompson at June 11. 2018

If they are the same as the ones on a Jubilee it is easy enough to compress the shock to remove the collets that hold it all together with the shock removed from the bike.

I used a sash cramp but be careful that the shock does not pop out of the cramp as that would be dangerous. My springs are so weak I could probably have pushed them by hand on the ground to remove the collets; the springs are only rated at 90lbs when new. I have heard, but never tried, using a ratchet tie down through the mounting eyes to compress the springs.

New chrome shrouds can be bought from the NOC shop for about a tenner.

Check the mounting rubbers are not perished (common problem). With the springs removed check the damper rod moves up and down smoothly with no oil leaks from the seal. Check there are no obvious wear marks on the rod. Check there is no lateral movement in the rod at max extension. I do not think that the seal and oil damper can be serviced, at least not for a reasonable cost.

If they are original shocks you might want to consider replacing them anyway as they have done their time. On EBay you can get pattern replacements for about £70 or Hagon ones for £200 or so.

Regards,

Dennis

Re: Rear Shocks

Posted by Andrew Wibmer at June 11. 2018

Previously dennis_thompson wrote:

If they are the same as the ones on a Jubilee it is easy enough to compress the shock to remove the collets that hold it all together with the shock removed from the bike.

I used a sash cramp but be careful that the shock does not pop out of the cramp as that would be dangerous. My springs are so weak I could probably have pushed them by hand on the ground to remove the collets; the springs are only rated at 90lbs when new. I have heard, but never tried, using a ratchet tie down through the mounting eyes to compress the springs.

New chrome shrouds can be bought from the NOC shop for about a tenner.

Check the mounting rubbers are not perished (common problem). With the springs removed check the damper rod moves up and down smoothly with no oil leaks from the seal. Check there are no obvious wear marks on the rod. Check there is no lateral movement in the rod at max extension. I do not think that the seal and oil damper can be serviced, at least not for a reasonable cost.

If they are original shocks you might want to consider replacing them anyway as they have done their time. On EBay you can get pattern replacements for about £70 or Hagon ones for £200 or so.

Regards,

Dennis

 

Thanks Dennis, much appreciated.

Re: Rear Shocks

Posted by dennis_thompson at June 12. 2018

Andrew, I missed off some vital information (old age)!

Having compressed the shock you need of course to secure the spring in its compressed state and then release the pressure on the shock. The collets should then fall or be eased out.

I used heavy duty tie wraps that self-lock on opposite sides of the length of the spring to keep the spring in tension before releasing the shock. A twist of heavy duty wire (coat hanger) or strong cord would do the same job.

Car coil compressors are too big to fit between spring coils and motorcycle ones are expensive (£30+) if you are only doing the job once.

Re: Rear Shocks

Posted by Andrew Wibmer at June 12. 2018

Previously dennis_thompson wrote:

Andrew, I missed off some vital information (old age)!

Having compressed the shock you need of course to secure the spring in its compressed state and then release the pressure on the shock. The collets should then fall or be eased out.

I used heavy duty tie wraps that self-lock on opposite sides of the length of the spring to keep the spring in tension before releasing the shock. A twist of heavy duty wire (coat hanger) or strong cord would do the same job.

Car coil compressors are too big to fit between spring coils and motorcycle ones are expensive (£30+) if you are only doing the job once.

Thanks Denis, they came apart reasonably easily, bottom mount held in vice, I pulled down the shroud and my mate lifted the collets. Certainly would not risk it on my own, would have lost a tooth.. As it happens I think they must be replacements as they are in such good order though the shrouds have some pitting. Think I will treat them and paint.

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